3 Takeaways From The 2022 Formula 1 Japanese Grand Prix

Sergio Alberto Romero, M.S.
3 min readOct 9, 2022
Photo by Tianshu Liu on Unsplash

Another race weekend and another race track full of water thanks to rain. While I would make the argument that this race was handled mildly better than Singapore was the previous weekend, I would still make the argument that Formula 1 needs to have a better solution to rain soaked tracks. We have tires that can be fitted on a muscle car and fair well in the snow, yet we can’t seem to get Formula 1 cars to safely race in the rain… I won’t spoil the whole article quite yet so let’s dig further into this with a more logical approach!

Charles Chokes On Corners

On the very final lap of the race, (29/53 in case you were curious) Charles Leclerc got caught out by Sergio Perez pushing ever harder to overtake him. When Sergio pushed Charles to the limit Charles ending up going off track and cutting the corner, this saved him from losing track position to Sergio before the end of the race however Charles was hit with a penalty where he ultimately lost out on 2nd place. Even though Charles had good pace throughout the entirety of the race it became very clear at the end that Sergio was able to pressure Charles Leclerc into a mistake. Something Lewis Hamilton couldn’t even do with the likes of Estaban Ocon. While I would like to say that perhaps next time Charles Leclerc could survive, this race made for Max Verstappen’s world championship victory, with four races to go. Poor Charles.

Can We Get Some Mudflaps please?

No, I’m not kidding either. Before you get too triggered by my new Formula 1 regulation suggestion, I don’t literally mean rally car style mudflaps, but something instead to just control the spray on race days that tend to be full of water on track. I don’t know how challenging this would be and it would likely need to be heavily regulated otherwise some cars will start to use the increase or decrease of spray as an advantage in some way shape or form. That being said, Formula 1 is billed as one of the most revolutionary takes on car technology, yet when the race cars go faster than 45MPH you can’t see anything simply because of the spray kicked up by the tires and the additional turbulence created by the rear turbulence. Seriously, engineer this spray issue away sooner rather than later.

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Sergio Alberto Romero, M.S.

The elements compose a magnum opus. My modus operandi is amalgam.